What On Earth

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What On Earth, two pages

Click here for the template in plain text


1 PURPOSE:
The idea behind What On Earth is to introduce a technology, often new, in a friendly and approachable way, in the style of an FAQ page or conversation.

2 WORD COUNT:
1,300 for the body alone - but this might be higher or lower depending on the size and shape of the accompanying illustration. If you would like to be sure, please contact the art editor. Email efrain.hernandez-mendoza@futurenet.co.uk

3 LAYOUT:
If there's anything you need to point out to design and production staff, label it ///DESIGN NOTE/// and put it IN CAPS at the beginning of the text in square brackets.

4 PICTURES AND BOXES:

  • We get What On Earth illustrated in-house.
  • We don't run any extra boxes in What On Earth, so there's no need for you to worry about them either!


5 STRUCTURE:

///TOP BAR///
WHAT ON EARTH xxx
Where xxx is the subject of the What On Earth

///TITLE///
What on Earth is... xxx?
Where xxx is the subject

///STANDFIRST///
A 15-25 word introduction to the subject and author.

///BODY COPY START///
Insert the article here.

Body copy notes:

  • Please talk to whoever commissioned you if you are not sure what to cover in the article.
  • What On Earth is written as an imaginary conversation between the author and their imaginary friend. The style and tone may be informal and amusing but don't overdo it. It's tempting to make all the questions negative and/or sceptical, but please resist, as this gives a generally negative tone to the whole What On Earth... It is important that you remember the Q&A format, and that neither question nor answer is too long. It's best to keep the questions well under 30 words, and the answers under 150 words at the extreme.

eg
This Plone thing sounds like some kind of wireless or VoiP handset. I'm guessing I'm wrong, unless this magazine is now Wi-Fi World... We're not talking about telephones, don't worry. Plone is a powerful content management system, you know.
Content management system? That sounds less than thrilling. What does it mean?
Don't judge too hastily. A content management system (CMS) is a nifty piece of software that's designed to manage, process and effectively deal with content in different ways

  • Ideally we would like to shy away from too much code, or command line sequences.
  • It is good to include the project homepage and other resources for people to find out more towards the end of the article.

///END BODY COPY///

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