'Instalment' has only one 'l'

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'Instalment' has only one 'l'

Postby Nobber » Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:21 pm

That's pretty much all I wanted to say, really.

There are far fewer spelling errors in LXF these days than, er, in the past, but it looks as if "installment" is a bugger to shift.

Here are some copies of the word that you are free to use as replacements:

instalment
instalment
instalment
instalment
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RE:

Postby Rhakios » Wed Feb 14, 2007 1:31 pm

Maybeso, but "installment" has two Ls:

installment \in*stall"ment\, instalment \in*stal"ment\, n.
1. The act of installing; installation.
[1913 Webster]

Take oaths from all kings and magistrates at their
installment, to do impartial justice by law.
--Milton.
[1913 Webster]

2. The seat in which one is placed. [Obs.]
[1913 Webster]

The several chairs of order, look, you scour; . . .
Each fair installment, coat, and several crest
With loyal blazon, evermore be blest. --Shak.
[1913 Webster]

3. A portion of a debt, or sum of money, which is divided
into portions that are made payable at different times;
that portion of a debt payed back in any one payment; as,
the next installment is due January first. Payment by
installment is payment by parts at different times, the
amounts and times being often definitely stipulated.
--Bouvier.
[1913 Webster +PJC]

4. a part of a broadcast serial. [WordNet sense 1]

Syn: episode.
[WordNet 1.5]

5. a part of a published serial. [WordNet sense 2]
[WordNet 1.5]


:)

Of course, there are two versions of the word, but where the UK spelling uses one L, the US uses 2 and vice versa (at least according to my Chambers dictionary). It's hardly worth bothering with.
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RE:

Postby Nobber » Wed Feb 14, 2007 2:01 pm

Here's what the Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary says:

instalment UK, US installment noun
one of a number of parts into which a story, plan or amount of money owed has been divided, so that each part happens or is paid at different times until the end or total is reached


Maybe it's because I live in Canada - which still can't make up its mind whether "colour" should have a "u" (for example) - that I crave adherence to linguistic standards.
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RE:

Postby Rhakios » Wed Feb 14, 2007 3:01 pm

Well, I for one shall now call my Linux installations, Linux installments, as my dictionary tells me is quite correct (if a little archaic) English. The "Advanced Learner's Dictionary" doesn't seem to know about that usage :)

Perhaps LXF are just trying to make US readers feel at home, from time to time.
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RE:

Postby wyliecoyoteuk » Wed Feb 14, 2007 10:22 pm

Linguistic standards and language are mutually incompatible.

If you live in Canada , you should be aware of the yawning gulf between French-Canadian and French languages.

The Uk and America have been described as "two countries divided by a common language"

You think you've got problems, I can only just understand street English these days.

I blame it all on Sacha Baron-Cohen. :-)


edit:P.S. I find it strange that I have 2 daughters:
1, aged 34, who I have real problems understanding at times, and 1 ,aged 31, who despite being severely dsylexic, struggled through a 4 year degree course, and speaks perfectly clear and understandable English.

Go figure

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RE:

Postby candy » Sun Feb 25, 2007 12:31 pm

I prefer install and installment personally, although I go with -led, ling for suffixes such as travelled. Things get the automatic -re and our for centre and favourite with me.

Thankfully Firefox has an Canadian dictionary as an add on so we don't have to use yours or the US in line spell checkers.

Like many who use Canadian spellings, I would say a car has four tires and runs on gas.
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Re: RE:

Postby Rhakios » Sun Feb 25, 2007 1:13 pm

candy wrote:Like many who use Canadian spellings, I would say a car has four tires and runs on gas.


LPG? ;)
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RE: Re: RE:

Postby M0PHP » Sun Feb 25, 2007 2:26 pm

Image

Four tyres, you say? ;)
Image Image Image
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RE: Re: RE:

Postby donoreo » Sun Feb 25, 2007 5:44 pm

Us Canadians are stuck in the middle in the spelling debate. We use UK style for some things, US style for others. I try to go by the "official" Oxford Canadian dictionary spellings.

I do use the Firefox Canadian dictionary, and when I install software I look for a Canadian locale version (including Windows when I install at work).
I cannot deny anything that I did not say.
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