Star Trek Replicator

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Star Trek Replicator

Postby Larry » Tue Aug 30, 2011 5:51 am

If you've been a fan of Star Trek, you no doubt wished you had a replicator. Just imagine, commanding this unit to make you your hearts desire, and out it comes. Well guess what, we are coming perilously close to achieving just that. I'll admit, it is true we're not ready to synthesize things at the atomic level just yet. However, realistically, at the macroscopic level, the replicator is here. Better yet, it's powered by LINUX! You'll have to learn a new programming language, but what a small price to pay. Tomorrow is here. Besides, if you're into LINUX, learning a new computer language is a way of life.

Rather than have you begin to doubt me, it's time to take a trip to youtube.com for a visual demonstration. Once you log on to youtube, enter into the search box, “emc2 demo”, and up will come several astounding videos such as, “5-axis milling demo with EMC2”, “Milling a camshaft (with EMC2)”, and many many more. While watching these machines make useful things, keep reminding yourself that LINUX is controlling the whole show. Before your eyes completely glass over, it's time to bring you back to reality by telling you how to get your hands on it.

The name of this project is titled, “Enhanced Machine Control”. The code base is hosted on sourceforge.net, but, more importantly, there is a home web site at, “linuxcnc.org”. This site is loaded with PDF files telling you everything you need to know to install, use, and in true open source style, how to modify and recompile it.

This technology is called, “CNC”, which stands for Computer Numerical Control. The name of the nemonics in this language, are called, “G codes”. Under EMC, and in fact it's latest incarnation, “EMC2”, the language has been greatly expanded. The most important expansions are, “o codes”, as in the letter o, not zero. These codes contain the important constructs that allow it to be a true programming language.

The open source community is on the threshold of its next great advancement. Computers are already writing our letters, keeping track of our money and playing games with us. The next great move is to have LINUX control the things that provide comfort to our world. LINUX will mind and supervise all of the daily drudge work that diminishes our quality of our life. Welcome to the next great frontier.
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Re: Star Trek Replicator

Postby RedWillow » Tue Aug 30, 2011 9:39 am

Larry wrote:LINUX will mind and supervise all of the daily drudge work that diminishes our quality of our life. Welcome to the next great frontier.


Welcome to Stepford! :(
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Hello RedWillow:

Postby Larry » Sun Sep 04, 2011 6:06 am

Addressing first my highlighted sentence in your reply, I suppose there is always reason for concern. Anytime you hand part of your existence off to a machine, you had better take extra care to ensure that that machine has your best interests in mind. Unfortunately for your angst, the technological horse has figuratively left the barn and is loose in the pasture. As we speak, the editors and publishers of LINUX Format are already embracing this concept, and are actively publishing text in this regard.

To begin, I direct you to LXF127 page #52. Here author Rob Dobozy details remote controlling your home via a computer, or cellphone. The article begins with the premise that your home is already fully automated. All that remains is to develop the necessary communications links to enable you to check and modify the orders that your automated home server is expected to carry out.

In the next instance, I direct you to LXF136 page #36. Here Graham Morrison, who happens to be the current editor of LINUX Format, reviews a book entitled, “Smart Home Automation with Linux”, by Steven Goodwin. In his review, his principle criticism lies not in weather the technology is evil, but rather he holds the opinion that there is simply not enough of it contained within the pages of this book.

Regarding the remarks in your reply, I assume you are alluding to a work by author, and playwright Ira Levin. Among other things, Mr. Levin is also credited with the Novel Rosemary's Baby. Yet another wholesome, and heartwarming family story. LOL!

If I am correct regarding your reference, I would like to calm your reservations by examining the following:

First, the project I am discussing has been released to the free and open source software community. That being the case, we, in the open source community, are in control of it.

Second, like any FOSS project, there are many many eyes inspecting the code. That being the case, there is little chance that anything malevolent could creep into the code. This is clearly not the case in the closed source camp.

Make no mistake, if you take the time to probe youtube for additional videos, you will discover CNC projects demonstrating the efforts of closed source and proprietary hardware vendors. This technology is coming, with or without free software. I believe our best hope is to carve out a section of this technology for the people. Should the opposite happen and it all ends up in the hands of the proprietary camp, I would then have to agree with you. In that case, there would be grounds for real concern

Returning to your presumed reference, I think, minus the android wives, Stepford Connecticut was a very pleasant Utopian kind of place. Granted, without a villain, the story would make for a torturously dull plot. Every science fiction, or, in this case, science horror novel requires a villain. My main problem with this work, as with so many works of this period, the villains are always scientists, engineers, or both. As a member of the high tech community, as is true of anyone developing cutting edge hardware or software, I feel this type of entertainment, asside from being personally offensive, may have some degree of adverse affect on impressionable young minds.

I do hope you took the time to visit youtube. If not, please do. I feel, after seeing the videos, you will feel differently regarding the direction of this project.

I want to stress that you don't need to own hardware to enjoy this software package. Like so many other FOSS projects, visiting the linuxcnc.org website, will allow you to obtain a live CD. It's the usual drill. Download the ISO, burn it to disk and reboot from the disk. Using one of the preconfigured test configurations, it is possible to write programs, and using another program in this suite, a program called back plot, you may view the success or failure of your program without spending so much as one pence on hardware.

So why not give it a try. What have you got to lose!
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Postby guy » Sun Sep 04, 2011 7:51 pm

Is 3D printing really referred to as CNC? In the days of my youth, CNC was all about machining surplus material away to form a shape from solid. When 3D printing arrived it was all about building up a shape from an amorphous fluid or powder. Meanwhile, the term "replicator" is now used to describe a device capable of reproducing itself, such as the Rep-Rap 3D printer capable of printing copies of its own mechanical parts.

The 3D printing of replacement (and, potentially, enhanced :shock:) human organs grown from stem cells is almost here - something that even Bones' surgery on the Enterprise lacked!

Meanwhile the arrival of new OSS is always good to hear about - whether for 3D printing or CNC.
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Postby Larry » Tue Sep 06, 2011 7:41 am

Thanks Guy, this is a really great question. First, in the early days of this technology, it was known as Numerical Control, or NC. I'm sure your familiar with machine tools reading commands from a punched paper tape. I only mention this for the benefit of our younger readers. Yes, for the most part, these commands were G codes, and, as you stated, they would remove material from blank stock to produce a finished part.

At least as far as my eyes can see, the horizon seems to indicate that Computer Numerical Control is a sufficiently general name so as to encompass all that precedes as well as all controllable devices to be invented in the future. I have seen CNC arc welder photos that, among other things, are used to deposit weldment on the surface of the journals of engine crank shafts. This weldment was later lathe machined to a specified critical dimension. Regrading 3D printing, I guess that you could call that the first instance of machining which adds material to the completed part. To make a short answer even longer, I would have to say that 3D printing would fall under the category of CNC. In fact, to my knowledge, these 3D printers are commanded by G codes, but I could be in error. Perhaps someone with hands on experience in these devices could add to this discussion.

The rest of your question opens for me an opportunity to explain my choice of the term replicator in the title of this thread. What I was doing was dropping a subtle hint as to the direction of where I think this technology is going for the hi tech home user. Consider, as in other script languages such as Perl, a library is created of programs freely available for the downloading. In my vision, I would call it the G code library. To further illustrate my point, suppose you're the owner of a home appliance such as a dishwasher. The unit has failed and you have deduced the problem to be located in a specific mechanical part. You log onto the net, and locate the manufacturers part number. After you record the number, you find that not only is the part no longer available, the manufacturer is no longer in business. After explaining this to the Mrs. and enduring her diatribe regarding how much harder her life will be doing the dishes by hand, you again retire to the world wide web. Searching for an answer, you discover the open source G code library. Lo and behold, there is a G code program with the same number as the part number you're looking for. It seems some poor chap half way around the world has suffered the same misfortune as you. He took the time to write a G code program describing the part, and has selflessly posted it to the library. You take a chance, down load the part, and plot it in the virtual world of the back plot program. This part seems to be exactly the part you need. You mount some blank material, run the program, and find that you have been saved by modern technology from a fate worse medieval torture. Namely, ongoing complaining from the Mrs. Your wife is so grateful, that each night for the next month, she fixes you your favorite dinner, and provides you with a back message just to atone for all the mean things she said to you regarding the failed dishwasher. Yah – right – maybe in a parallel universe, but not this one!

Regarding the Rep-Rap 3D printer, I seem to recall that the same claim was made for the metal lathe. This machine, however; definitely comes closer to doing this automatically than any other to date. As for growing organs from G code, I'll bet it's going to be a really big program, but mass storage is getting cheaper every day.

I hope I answered your questions and stimulated your appetite to investigate further. Actually I have other visions for the application of this technology, but before I drift off into the aether, I had better end this post.

Enjoy!
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Postby guy » Tue Sep 06, 2011 8:40 pm

Thanks for the fascinating reply. I think you are right about the dishwasher. I reckon we'll see a battle break out between open- and closed-source hardware vendors. Do I rent (no, you can't buy one, the license is clear about that!) a Microslop Winwash that looks shiny but has expensive spare parts and tablets which gum up the filters, or buy a RedSplat Linwash service contract (the dishwasher itself is free) where I can print off any part for free and use any brand of tablet? In fact the only reason to buy a Linwash contract is if you are too busy or lazy or dumb to install a (freely available) one yourself.
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Postby Larry » Fri Sep 09, 2011 6:52 pm

Hi Guy:

You were rite. My neighbor bought a brand new Microslop license. His wife bought the wrong tablets. When she ran the machine, it made a snarling noise, broke the cut glass goblets, and stopped working. When the service center was called, the attendant logged on, and did an anti tamper harassment reset. Lucky for the wife, no harm was done to the unit, but she received three demerits, you are only allowed twelve. She also made a list of defective users to watch. When asked about restitution for the goblets, she was told their license didn't cover artistic glass. They would need to purchase an expensive system upgrade. Grudgingly, they went back to the store and bought the upgrade. Returning home, they plugged the upgrade, complete with genuine Microslop hologram, into the control panel face. After power up, the control panel suddenly went blank, then new windows, and new buttons appeared. Big problem, there were no labels on anything. Calling the service center again, they were told they needed advance service permission to plug in the new upgrade. You guessed it, another demerit. The center logged in and told them they needed to select a language lock in. Lock in? What's a lock in! They were told to be more courteous, or this call would be terminated! They both apologized for asking an inappropriate question. The lock in proceeded. The attendant told them that normally the upgrade would take one minute, but since they were on a list of defective users, it would take an additional three. You're license only allows ten. After one minute, the labels appeared along with a gentle pastel blue backlit Microslop hologram. After three more, the hologram turned from blue to dark red signifying a defective user. At the bottom, a warning message appeared admonishing them to properly set all 128 user configuration switches, or Microslop would not be responsible for any damaged dishes. All configurations are plainly explained in the eleven-hundred page user manual available from Microslop publishing. They took a deep breath, crossed their fingers, and pressed the quick setup default settings button.

Days passed, the Mrs. bought only the most expensive Microslop tablets from the most expensive Microslop franchised store she could find. They only used crack proof plastic dishes, and cast iron pots that would not break even if you dropped the Microslop machine on top of them. The unit uses a lot more electricity, and strangely, the genuine Microslop hologram, which is in the shape of an eye, seems to be following them about the kitchen. Then again, these perceptions are probably only the musings of a paranoid user who secretly desires to use only open hardware appliances.

Weeks later, they received a letter from Microslop. The first lines of the letter are as follows:

“Thank you for using genuine Microslop. By purchasing only genuine Microslop, you can be assured of 24 hour 7 day a week customer service that only a proprietary hardware supplier can provide. Remember, when you buy an open hardware appliance, you might risk damage to your dishes, injury to your person, wasteful power consumption, or the loss of your home. At Microslop, our motto is, “Remember, you can sleep easy with Microslop!”.

At this time, we invite you to browse the enclosed brochure of other fine Microslop family products. Rest assured, all Microslop products are completely interconnectable. Indeed, unless you buy two or more Microslop licenses, many of our features may not be available.”

The letter goes on to report how well the company is doing financially, and thus you can be assured of continued service.


Meanwhile, I'm trying to get the RedSplat home. It seems they won't deliver it unless I purchase a service contract. Rest assured, I'll get it home. Even if I have to build a pickup truck from scratch!
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Postby guy » Sat Sep 10, 2011 5:42 pm

Meanwhile, let's visit the USS Enterprise with her new user interface.
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Postby Larry » Tue Sep 13, 2011 3:14 am

Thanks Guy. I guess the benchmark for a complicated panel truly is when you have the memory of an android, but you still can't locate the shields button. Where's Spock when we need him.

In other news, I had an opportunity to view a link on the home page of LINUX Format. It's current position is on the right side about half way down the page. The link is entitled, “Karen Sandler: Freedom from my heart to the desktop”. This link is apparently pointing to tuxradar.com. Do take the time to view the video. I do wish it could be in a format other than, “shockwave flash”, still the content is worth the view. Her presentation was delivered at OSCon,(open source convention). By her own claim, she was an attorney for the Software Freedom Law Center. She has since resigned to assume the new position of executive director of the GNOME project. I was gratified to discover that her views on the transparency of both hardware and software closely parallel mine. It was even more encouraging to hear these views coming from someone so high in the hierarchy of the free software community. As I have previously stated, we can either carve out a part of this technology for the people, or the proprietary community will get it all.

In that spirit, I would like to congratulate, LINUX Format staffer, Nick Veitch for his continuing articles surrounding the Adruino processor board. He is really doing a great job acquainting a large group of the software development community to what can be done with a software hardware implementation. Indeed, my motivation for presenting you with the LINUX EMC2 suite is for the same reason. That software suite punches a gaping hole in the barrier between software and hardware. Though I must confess, my work in the software hardware world is a bit more hard core, the Adruino is still a great place to start. I started out with the, “PIC”, series of micro-controllers manufactured by Microchip. When I began, the PICs could be burned, but you had to use an ultraviolet light to erase them. There were no readily available boards. What you did was get the PIC data sheet, and the PIC applications manual. From these books, you cooked up your own circuit and board. It was much harder work, but it was also much more gratifying. My work with microprocessors goes even further back than that. In the 80's, I built, from scratch, a microcomputer with an Intel 8085 CPU, 4k of AMD static ram, and some assorted parallel port peripherals. The CPU clocked at a blistering 4Mhz. In the classic style of the Data General NOVA2, and NOVA3 mini computers, it even had a window with the top row of 16 red light emitting diodes being the address bus, and the bottom row of eight leds being the data bus. When it was running, it really put on quite a light show. Yes I wrote programs for the NOVA2 in assembly. Don't ask me to do that today, all of that knowledge has rotted away from my memory.

With the head of the GNOME project in concurrence, the time has come, for at least part of the time, to put down our development software, and pick up our soldering irons.

IT'S TIME TO TAKE OUR HARDWARE BACK!!!
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Postby Larry » Fri Sep 16, 2011 5:14 am

The location of information over time is perhaps the least stable aspect of the internet. You book mark a location for some relevant content, only to find the next time you click on the book mark, the information is no longer there. So it is with my last post on this topic.

In my previous post, I sited a presentation by Karen Sandler as being present on the home page of LINUX Format. Since then, the link has evaporated into cyberworld thin air. Such is life on the world wide web. I mentioned that the link seemed to be pointing to, “tuxradar.com”. That link is still there, however; I believe a more stable source for this video, at least currently, is on YouTube. Go to YouTube, in the search box type, “OSCON 2011: Karen Sandler”. This should bring up the intended video. I believe if you read my previous post without first seeing the video, the content of what I am saying loses some of its relevance. So please do view the video, then read my previous post.

As long as I again enjoy the privilege of your attention, even though it is not quite on topic for this thread, I truly believe you will find it enjoyable. While looking for the previous referenced video, I discovered yet another presentation that I think is really heart warming. The video is also on YouTube. You can find it by typing the following in the search box, “OSCON 2011: Jim Zemlin”. The exact video you are look for is, “OSCON 2011: Jim Zemlin, “2011: The Bizarro World of Computing”. As many of you already know, Mr. Zemlin is the executive director of the LINUX foundation. His presentation, among other things, chronicles the advancement the open source community has made. In a world when many of us feel that we are banging our heads against a brick wall, it's very gratifying to hear just how far we've come.

Please view this, and enjoy.
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Postby M-Saunders » Fri Sep 16, 2011 10:36 am

Lo,

Larry wrote:In my previous post, I sited a presentation by Karen Sandler as being present on the home page of LINUX Format. Since then, the link has evaporated into cyberworld thin air. Such is life on the world wide web. I mentioned that the link seemed to be pointing to, “tuxradar.com”. That link is still there, however; I believe a more stable source for this video, at least currently, is on YouTube.


The TuxRadar post embeds the YouTube vid, so it's the same thing. And the LXF front page just shows the 10 most recent posts on TuxRadar for space reasons.

Nothing gets deleted -- it just moves further back in the archives :-)

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Postby Nerdy-ish » Wed Sep 21, 2011 12:41 pm

If such a device ever existed, I'm sure you would be sued into oblivion for aiding "Intellectual Property theft."
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Postby Larry » Sun Sep 25, 2011 12:41 am

Hi Mike:

It's good to hear from you. In all seriousness, before I start my reply, I would like to congratulate you on your ongoing efforts toward inventing your own OS. This is no small undertaking. Your perseverance is an example to all others attempting to bring an open source project to the stage of popularity.

On the less serious side, so as not to be left out, I have decided to develop my own OS. Not wishing to rush things, I'll be launching mine in the year 2055. That's when Intel, under intergalactic agreement, rolls out their 1024 bit centa-core processor. On that very same day, I'll be taking advantage of secret inside information, and parade out my own, “Fault Free”, OS. I simply call it, “Empire”! No happy kitties here, my trade mark's a thermonuclear mushroom cloud! Displayed in hologram of course. To heck with warm and fuzzy, I'm going for the big kahuna! After infecting, I mean auto-installing, on every existing piece of known electronic equipment; I'll roll out my ultimate information coup. Via my proprietary telepathic cyber-mouse, I'll gather and sell all of the personal information of every life form dumb enough, I mean capable of activating it. At first, I thought my company motto should be, “Do no evil”. It has a nice ring, but sounds just too close to that other company. I therefore settled on, “Never give a sucker an even break”. It seems more to the point.

Returning to the mundane things of life, It's probably time for me to comment on your reply posting. I didn't mean to imply that the information was no longer available. In fact, I did mention that the information was still available on, “tuxradar.com”. I guess my point is there is no handy archive link on your home page. This is just a wild guess on my part, but from your page layout I'm assuming your CMS is Drupal. Yes, among the many other things I use to torment myself, I also do web development for fun and profit. If my guess is correct, I can fully appreciate the effort involved in modifying an existing, “Theme”, to reflect anything new. That said,(You must have guessed this was coming) it would be nice to have an archive link directly below all of the tuxradar links on your home page. It seems to me to be a more intuitive aid when searching for older material.

OK Nerdy-ish, it's your turn:

To begin, I want to stress that I'm not an attorney. Therefore you are not to take any of this as professional legal advise. When faced with legal issues, especially international law, it is highly recommended to seek the advise of a legal professional. Having dispensed with the usual C.Y.A. disclaimers, it's time to share some of my personal opinions, and experiences.

First, I feel there is, in general, an exaggerated unrealistic fear of the patent, “Boogy Man”. Referring to my earlier post, I was careful to construct a scenario where the company either abandoned support for the product, or had ceased doing business altogether. Should there be notice of infringement, these two items go a significant way to produce an outcome in your favor. Having said that, it is only fair to support the original manufacturer as long as they continue to support the product in a non onerous way. This should continue be true unless some entity has developed a replacement component found to be superior in either quality, or durability compared to the original, (This can, and usually does, make for an interesting court case!). By custom, and sometimes by legal requirement, manufacturers tend to post a list of pertinent patent numbers on their products. When in doubt, download the patents from one of the online repositories. After reading these patents, you will quickly find what was legally granted as protected intellectual property. You'll be surprised to discover just how little is really protected. Further, you will discover that most of what constituted this product is part of the free public domain. This can occur either by virtue of expired patents, copyrights, or longstanding established custom and commerce. The last part of the previous sentence is what protects you from paying royalties to someone for using the concept of a wheel on the bicycle you just built.

Should you be served with a reasonable notice of infringement, the usual course of action is to simply remove the product or information from the market accompanied by a big, “I'M SORRY!”. Problem solved. In theory, you could be pursued for financial loss, but the property holder would have to prove, among other things, prior knowledge of the protected property. Moral, do your patent search on someone else's computer; preferably in another city. LOL! It is interesting to note that what usually fails in a protected mechanical device is usually not intrinsic to the intellectual property grant. Therefore, the act of carefully crafting a replacement part that only repairs what is worn usually excludes you from liability.

Taking all of the above into account, there is an intricate distinction in case law between an entity affecting a repair, as in performing a service, as opposed to someone producing a large quantity of items for sale, as in manufacturing. If you decide to support a discontinued product by supplying large numbers of replacement parts for sale, you had better also have retained a high power law firm to defend you. Such is the cost of doing business in the modern world. On the service side of things, the act of renovating an antique auto, and then publishing the method of your restoration, is generally acceptable. It is this service side of things that I am confining my above solutions to. Not mass producing replacement parts!

Regarding any of my above opinions, I do invite comment from the legal community. After all, this is a thread on a, “Discussion Forum”. I'm sure we could all benefit from your legal expertise.

In the matter of your expressed doubt concerning the existence of such a repair device, I again refer you to the youtube videos I cited at the beginning of this thread. It is not just one device, but rather a family of devices that perform these feats. Rite before your eyes, you can view parts being created from blank stock. Of particular interest is a web site I recently became aware of. This web site is provided by a person I know very well. Until recently he was keeping this information private. He has recently, as evidenced by the posting at the bottom of the web page, released this information under the creative commons copyright.

You can view the site:

http://sites.google.com/site/calculatingrisk/Home/cnc-mill

[Note: Should the embedded hyperlink fail to appear, manually enter the following URL “http://sites.google.com/site/calculatingrisk/Home/cnc-mill” into your browser search window]

The page I direct you to is a description of the conversion of a milling machine of Taiwanese manufacture that you could replicate as well. Both the author and I share the opinion that the quality of machine tools from Taiwan is of a higher quality than what is available from mainland China. All of this information arose from an undergrad project pursuant to the attainment of a Bachelor of Science in both Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering. He is currently in graduate school pursuing a Doctorate in Mechanical Engineering.

On this page, figure 1.7 – 1.8 depict conversion of the, “X”, axis of the machine. Conversion of the, “Y and Z”, axis remain. Figure 1.1 shows the computer running with the EMC2 software hosted atop an Ubuntu platform. One thing of importance here is that it is running on a real time kernel. This is a significantly modified standard kernel. The purpose of a real time kernel is to guarantee certain high priority events, as in stepping a stepper motor, to occur at a specific time.

One last thing, before I end up describing the whole article, is to direct your attention again to figure 1.1. The monitor displays a window with a blue background. This is the TKEMC user interface. To my knowledge, this is the oldest interface used on the EMC2 project. This interface was written using the TCL/TK computer language. Since, if possible, I can't resist looking under the hood, I had to learn the TCL language. It has since become one of my favorites. There are more recent user interfaces written in Python. That's the beauty of open source. You can pick your own platform.

I do want to emphasize that this web site is not exclusively devoted to machine control. Rather it's an eclectic ensemble of various research pursuits. From a preliminary article describing the construction of a scanning tunneling atomic microscope, to such mundane pursuits as installing a working hot tub.

I suppose inspecting a contour at the atomic level while soaking in a tub with your girlfriend might have some redeeming intellectual value. Then again, one is only twenty something for, well – er um – ten years.

Do check out the web site. It's a fun adventure.
Last edited by Larry on Wed Sep 28, 2011 7:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby M-Saunders » Mon Sep 26, 2011 9:33 am

Larry wrote:it would be nice to have an archive link directly below all of the tuxradar links on your home page.


It's already there -- click "Older posts". Then you can cycle through pages in the archive using links at the bottom.

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Postby Larry » Fri Sep 30, 2011 6:08 am

Update:

After posting my reply of September 25, 2011 I had a number of conversations with friends asking how the, “Y and Z”, axis are converted. I want to assure everyone that conversion of the, “Y and Z”, axis are virtually identical to the, “X”. The, “Y”, axis conversion is exactly identical. The mechanical mounting of the motor to the, “Z”, axis is, due to space limitations, somewhat different. Since the machine you convert will likely not be of the same model, or make, the actual mechanical adapters you will need are left as a trivial exercise to the ingenuity of the builder. The electronics for all three axis are exactly identical, and therefore shown only once. Once again all of this information is available at:

http://sites.google.com/site/calculatingrisk/Home/cnc-mill

Since the same referenced reply, I have also found two youtube videos showing the EMC2 software controlling actual robots. You may view these here:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L4OTtFpZV7U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ssrf9PtJIzU&NR=1

Do take the time to check out both URLs. They are all well worth the view.

Enjoy!
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